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18 Things No One Tells You About Sharing a House With Other Graduates

Sharing a house at university is something special. You all have the same free time, you were all able to get to know each other beforehand and, despite the palpable smell of Fosters and that one housemate who persists in stealing milk, it was a happy place.

But for graduates house sharing is a different, competitive beast. You no longer count as a student and lose all the benefits that come with it.

Welcome to the desperate world of the nomads.

1. It’s all a big popularity contest.

In highly competitive areas it takes more than just having the money to get a place. You need to be able to clean up after yourself as well as play the entertainer.

via melonstyle.deviantart.com

via melonstyle.deviantart.com

2. You should prepare to be rejected.

Back to having spareroom.com open on an incognito window at work.

via tvguide.com

via tvguide.com

3. Speed Flatmating is a thing.

You get so desperate that you end up spending your Tuesday evenings in the weird, drunken limbo of Speed Flatmating. Disclaimer: it is not a date.

via xclusivetouch.co.uk

via xclusivetouch.co.uk

4. You will never be above posting desperate Facebook pleas.

“Anyone know of a cheap room going in East London? Thanks.”

via socialanxietysupport.com

via socialanxietysupport.com

5. Despite signing up for email alerts, you will always be too late.

Receive them on the way to work to ring up at lunch time and be told it is no longer available.

via mtvjerseyshore.tumblr.com

via mtvjerseyshore.tumblr.com

6. You will meet a lot of weirdos.

Actually, I think I’ll keep looking.

via trilllakillla.tumblr.com

via trilllakillla.tumblr.com

7. You will make up interests just to satisfy would-be housemates.

“Looking for a housemate with an interest in horology and land amphibians.” Yep. That’s me.

mylifethroughemmastone.tumblr.com

mylifethroughemmastone.tumblr.com

8. The age range of your flatmates can be… unnerving. 

Being close to your work, being affordable and being tolerable are the necessities. It’s not until moving in you realise you are living with two 40 year olds, a 17 year old and a dog.

via alexbooky.tumblr.com

via alexbooky.tumblr.com

9. You will live with people who work shifts and probably never see them.

The Daily Touch / via pure-satisfaction.tumblr.com

The Daily Touch / via pure-satisfaction.tumblr.com

10. It’s always someone’s Friday night.

Don’t expect to sleep when it’s your Tuesday but their Friday.

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11. You will lose all enthusiasm to make new friends.

With years at uni building relationships and years ensuring you keep in contact with your friends from home, add in the small talk at work and by the time you’re in your house you just want to face plant the pillow.

phoneuse

via huffingtonpost.com

12. You’ll be even more attached to your things.

And there aren’t enough hiding places for your precious uni branded mug.

via laslow.net

via laslow.net

13. There is always a de facto house leader.

Chances are your houseshare has an authoritarian who has lived there for years. This Van Wilder will act like the place is theirs.

via soletstalkabout.com

via soletstalkabout.com

14. You’ll never see your housemates’ rooms.

Like a house within a house, the bedroom becomes your only real piece of property. A bit like those tents in Harry Potter.

via uproxx.com

via uproxx.com

15. You’ll also never use the front room.

You’ll basically be watching TV with strangers.

via criterionforum.org

via criterionforum.org

16. Just because you’re all adults now doesn’t mean there won’t be petty arguments.

via wifflegif.com

via wifflegif.com

17. You won’t know what to do when you see your housemates outside. 

What a moment it is when you realise Sarah from downstairs also takes the no. 73 at 08:32 every morning.

ryani182.wordpress.com

via ryani182.wordpress.com

18. But on the plus side, landlords are a lot nicer.

You are finally a real, functioning adult. No need to be conned by letting agents any more.

via tombraiderforums.com

via tombraiderforums.com

Why can’t we just all live on one long corridor again?