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8 Struggles You’ll Face When You Start Your First Real Graduate Job

Being the newbie at work is never an easy task. And that’s never more accurate than when your new job in your first proper, real-world, do-something-wrong-and-there’ll-be-consequences, graduate job.

The first few weeks are nerve-wracking, you want to prove to the people who hired you that you’re capable of doing your job, but as the newbie, chances are you won’t have a clue what you’re doing for a little while. Then there’s that terrible work/life balance that gets thrown horribly out of whack.

1. Not wanting to make an idiot of yourself.

You’ll probably spend most of your first week apologising to people for forgetting their names, asking where you can find the toilet, double checking where to file important documents and generally feeling like you don’t know anything.

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via giphy.com

2. Trying to figure out how to show initiative without getting things wrong.

You probably want to show that your employers haven’t wasted their time hiring you and prove that you have the initiative to do your job properly and independently… but of course if you act on your own initiative straight away you might end up making a mistake.

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via giphy.com

3. The horrible feeling that everybody else is more qualified than you.

You’re probably acutely aware that everybody around you is far more experienced than you are, and there’s a part of you that thinks you’ll never catch up.

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via giphy.com

4. Feeling like a useless member of the team.

When everybody around you knows what they’re doing and can get on with their job, it’s easy to feel a bit like you’re a waste of space. You cringe every time you have to ask for help.

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via giphy.com

5. Realising that you have more casual clothes than you’ll ever need.

When you’re wearing smart clothes five days a week you quickly realise that the wardrobe and chest of drawers that used to house your ripped skinny jeans and slogan t-shirts will be overrun by suits, ties, formal dresses and black shoes. Lots of black shoes.

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via giphy.com

6. Getting paid a lot more… but having no time to spend it.

If this is your first full-time, salaried job, you’re probably earning a lot more than you used to. The only downside is that you never have any time left to spend it any more. (At least you can save up for important adult things… like bills).

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via giphy.com

7. Dealing with the fact that you’re going to have to get out of bed, get ready, and go to work early every single morning for the rest of your life from now on.

And with only 20 days holiday a year instead of the 20 weeks you got at uni.

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via giphy.com

8. And the upsetting realisation that you’ve officially joined the real world.

Let’s face it; you’ve worked your way up through the education system to get here and now you’ve finally arrived. Suddenly you feel that this is probably where you’re going to be for some time to come.

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via giphy.com

Time to crack open the wine and count down to retirement… only 55 years to go!

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