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25 Things All Languages Students Know To Be True

Languages degrees are arguably the most varied of degrees out there. In spite of this, there are some things that all languages students know to be true.

1. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t love absolutely everything about the language and culture you’re learning.

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via giphy.com

2. Partly because a good percentage of what you learned before university turned out to be incorrect.

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via reactiongifs.com

3. Learning grammar in a foreign language teaches you, above all, just how little you knew about English grammar.

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via headoverfeels.com

4. You worried that you’d be the least fluent after the Year Abroad.

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via buzzfeed.com

5. But, really, neither you, nor anybody else has any idea what fluency means.

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via pedestrian.tv

6. Or if it’s even possible to be completely fluent in a language.

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via forums.worlize.com

7. You cannot trust Google Translate.

At all.

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via livejournal.com

8. And you can’t always trust WordReference either.

But you do appreciate their examples.

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via imgur.com

9. You’ll never learn to be OK with people randomly asking you to say things in your target language.

Or translate everything on menus.

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via plus.google.com

10. Mostly because, when it happens, it’s usually something you don’t know how to say.

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via wifflegif.com

11. So you just say something that gives the general gist and hope they’re not testing you.

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via buzzfeed.com

12. No amount of improvement in your language skills makes speaking exams or phone calls abroad any less distressing.

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13. And you will never appreciate people telling you how jealous they are that one of your exams is “just a conversation”.

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via buzzfeed.com

14. You automatically know to falsely claim you can’t hear the recording during a listening exam so that you can listen to as many test snippets as possible. 

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via wordpress.com

15. The struggle against subjectivity is real.

“What you said was perfectly correct but it’s not how I would’ve said it, therefore it’s not right. Even though it is, technically.”

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via neogaf.com

16. As is the fear that Word will automatically change all the accents in your essay again before you submit it.

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via giphy.com

17. You will be irreversibly traumatised by at least one film in a foreign language.

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via s15.zetaboards.com

18. And you’ll spend a small fortune on various, obscure books on your reading list that you may or may not actually need.

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via buzzfeed.com

19. You regularly hear how many doors are open to you thanks to your degree.

But you’re yet to see what all of these doors lead to.

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via giphy.com

20. And yet people are still determined to categorise you into being either a teacher or translator.

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via giphy.com

21. You never fully recover from Year Abroad culture shock.

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via gifmania.com

22. And you genuinely worry that once you’ve graduated you’ll completely forget how to speak anything but English.

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23. Mostly because you really enjoy mumbling about people in another language so that they can never know what you’re saying.

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24. The thought of leaving your coursemates after graduation is a thousand times more upsetting for you because you’ve all been through so much together.

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via tumblr.com

25. Above all, even after four years of struggling with subjunctives and being judged on how well you roll your r’s, you know you made the right choice to study languages.

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