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11 Reasons Why You Should Consider Teaching English Abroad After Uni

If you’re a recent (or even a not-so-recent) graduate still not sure what you want to do with your life, here’s why teaching English abroad could be the solution to your problems.

1. The weather.

An obvious one to start with, but imagine waking to bright sunshine and glorious heat rather than struggling out of bed on a freezing January morning. Plus, if you’re lucky enough to teach in a Mediterranean country, this is a possibility all year round, and it really does improve your mood and productivity.

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2. You have the flexibility to go anywhere.

Once you’ve obtained a Bachelor’s degree and a CELTA certificate, the possibilities really are endless. Finding a job is not usually too difficult, and pretty much every country where English isn’t the mother language will have opportunities. If you’re a real adventurer, you could even move around year after year. Bored of Europe? Why not head to East Asia or South America. The world is your oyster.

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3. And the opportunity to learn a new language.

It takes time, patience, and a lot of embarrassing moments, but it goes without saying that moving to another country is the best way to learn a language. Whether it’s Spanish, Italian, or Chinese you fancy, after a year or so with the right attitude you could find yourself nattering away to the locals – a truly rewarding feeling.

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4. The hours.

Forget killing yourself with stressful twelve hour working days. The average EFL teacher only has 5-6 hours of teaching per day. This means you can work and enjoy the sights and bars of your new city all at the same time.

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5. The culture.

As well as a new language, you will also be exposed to new food and drink, museums, sights, lifestyles, ways of thinking… It’s enough to make anybody feel excited!

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6. A cheaper lifestyle.

Okay, the downside is that you may not earn a king’s salary, but don’t let that put you off. If you choose your country wisely, you will find that you can live very comfortably on a teacher’s wage. Accommodation, food and drink, and all your basic needs are much cheaper in the majority of places compared to the UK. As long as you don’t have an extremely extravagant lifestyle, you shouldn’t find money to be an issue.

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7. The boost to your CV.

Some people claim teaching English abroad is a waste of time and just an excuse to have fun. But consider the skills you can demonstrate to potential future employers. You can say you successfully moved to and integrated in a new country, as well as learning a new language. Plus, within teaching itself you need to show leadership, organization, ability to motivate, and many other skills. They often say employers like candidates who have something a bit ‘different’ on their CV, and this could be it for you.

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8. You become interesting to others.

Never has the sentence “I’m from Cambridge” been met with such enthusiasm as it did when I was teaching abroad. To the natives, you are a rare, exotic being and you can expect lots of interest and questions about yourself wherever you go – perfect for an attention-seeker like me.

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9. Nine month contracts!

Schools and institutions offer you work from September to June. While this doesn’t guarantee job security, it does mean that you can do something a bit different if you’d like in the summer. Christmas and Easter holidays are also often paid, meaning that you can still pop home to see friends and family, and indulge in the full English breakfast that you’ve been craving for so long.

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10. Making friends with people you’d never expect.

Moving abroad means you’ll be thrown together with people from all walks of life, and whether it’s a housemate or a work colleague, you never know what friends you may make. Who would’ve known I’d end up mates with a Spanish tour guide and a Russian pilot!

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11. Most importantly, it’s fun!

The job itself is constantly active, and you will find the days just fly by. It can be truly fulfilling seeing somebody’s English improve, and you can really make a difference to their job prospects in the future. Teaching English abroad may not be something you want to do forever, but why not try it? And if you don’t like it, the worst case scenario is you can call it an extended holiday and come back. Now, what’s not to love about that?

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