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Results From The Government’s TEF Can No Longer Be Used To Raise Tuition Fees

You might remember that back in January we reported that the government’s new Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) would be used to dictate by how much a university can raise its tuition fees, depending on National Student Survey (NSS) results, dropout rates, and graduate destinations. Led by the National Union of Students (NUS), students have been actively boycotting this year’s NSS out of fear and anger that by providing positive feedback they are indirectly enabling their university to raise its tuition fees. However, this has now changed.

Yesterday, the House of Lords passed an amendment which says the TEF cannot be used to determine university tuition fees.

Peers backed by 263 to 211 the amendment, rejecting government plans to use TEF ratings as a way to allow universities to introduce potentially uncapped tuition fees.

The amendment has been met with support from the NUS and students alike.

However, the victory for those in opposition to the TEF may be short-lived.

Sorana Vieru, NUS Vice-President (Higher Education), took to social media to point out that, although this is a “major win for students”, it’s also “not a complete win.” The vote could be overturned when it moves back to the House of Commons next month.

It remains to be seen whether the government will accept the amendment or force its proposals through with the backing of MPs. As Vieru says: “It’s a concession we are going to have to fight to keep.”

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