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12 Dissertation Problems That Still Haunt You Long After You’ve Graduated

“Once it’s handed in you never have to think about it again,” they said. That’s just simply not true, though.

There are some dissertation problems that will continue to haunt you long after you’ve graduated.

1. That time you forgot to write down the source for The Most Perfect Reference Ever.

And couldn’t find it again because you’d read that many texts.

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2. When that mid-dissertation crisis hit and you felt like you no longer understood what you were writing about.

To start again or not to start again…

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3. The worry that someone else was going to make the exact same point as you.

Or that they already had and you just hadn’t realised.

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4. Genuinely feeling like no matter how much you wrote, you weren’t getting any closer to that word count.

“I’m explaining things in the most long-way-around way possible ffs.”

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5. When you sent a draft to your supervisor and they ripped it to shreds. Metaphorically.

After that, graduate job rejections are basically water off a duck’s back.

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6. Finding out one of your friends had already finished and submitted theirs.

Meanwhile, you could not be further from finished.

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7. Reading through what you’d written and just thinking “who would want to read this?”

🗑🗑🗑

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8. Needing to have a break but then feeling guilty for taking one because you weren’t working on your dissertation.

It’s no way to live, and it happens all over again when it comes to looking for a graduate job.

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9. When you realised how much printing just one copy was going to cost you.

“Do you think I’m made of money?”

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10. Only discovering a pretty glaring typo after you had it bound.

WHY?

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11. That moment of panic just before you were about to hand it in where you wondered whether it would actually be better to submit nothing.

Is it better to fail by default rather than fail because you potentially produced a piece of work so embarrassing your lecturers will talk about it at the dinner table for years to come?

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12. And finally, the excruciatingly long wait to find out how you’d done.

At least it prepared you for what was to come when applying for graduate jobs. 😅

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